The mission of the NIH is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability. The NIH has integrated the highest level of public accountability into its scientific mission through access to its research data. To that end, the Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools provide access to reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities, including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research.

What is the difference between RePORT and RePORTER?

The RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) website provides access to a variety of reporting tools, reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities. One of the tools available on the RePORT site is the RePORTER (RePORT Expenditures and Results) module. RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of NIH-funded research projects and access publications and patents resulting from NIH funding.

What is the NIH Budget and how is it spent?

Information on the NIH budget and how it is spent can be found on the NIH Office of Budget Homepage as well as the Budget and Spending and Categorical Spending pages of the RePORT site.

How can I find dollars awarded by specific NIH budget mechanisms?

Information on funding by the various NIH budget mechanisms is available on the Budget and Spending page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

Where can I find a summary or detailed information on the number of Career Research Awards NIH funds on an annual or fiscal year basis?

Please view the NIH Data Book presentation to find information on NIH Career Research Awards.

How can I find dollars awarded by specific NIH activity codes?

Information on funding by the various NIH activity codes is available on the Budget and Spending page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

Where can I find NIH Research Career Awards by Investigator?

Please view the NIH Research Career Program Awards by Investigator spreadsheet to find data available on the NIH Research Training Opportunities: Outcome and Administration Information website in a spreadsheet.

How were the NIH spending categories chosen?

The categories include those that were, over time, requested by Congress and other Federal agencies for reporting to Congress and the public.

Can new research areas, diseases, or conditions be added to the list of spending categories?

The NIH spending categories are those that the NIH has historically reported to Congress and the public. New categories will be considered after the NIH has gained more experience with a new reporting process (RCDC) begun in FY 2008. Existing categories will continue to be refined periodically to reflect scientific advances.

How are “NIH spending categories" defined?

NIH Spending Categories are historically-reported categories of diseases, conditions, or research areas. Beginning in fiscal year 2008, a computerized process has been used at the end of each fiscal year to estimate spending in these categories. Projects by Spending Category for each fiscal year are made available the following fiscal year as part of the next President’s Budget request.

How do I find a breakdown of the NIH budget by the focus of the research being conducted?

You can find information regarding the NIH budget broken down by several different reporting categories by clicking on Categorical Spending on the RePORT Home Page.

How do I find the total funding provided by multiple institutes and centers for a particular area of research, condition, or disease?

Beginning with fiscal year 2008, detailed information on spending in many historically-reported categories of research is available on the NIH Categorical Spending page, accessible from the RePORT home page. Here, project lists are available that show the cost of each project and the Institute or Center that has provided project funding. These lists can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis. Project lists can also be generated using RePORTER. Select the disease you would like to search on from the “Spending Category” search field and select the Institutes and Centers of interest in the Agency/Institute/Center search field. Be sure to check the "Funding" radio button to search for projects that each Agency/Institute/Center has funded (as opposed to providing programmatic administration). The hit list resulting from the query can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.

How do I find the total amount of funding received by a particular organization?

Information on funding to each research organization is available on the Funded Organizations page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

How do I submit a request to correct an error in the information posted on the RePORT web site?

To submit a request to correct an error on RePORT, please use the feedback button found at the bottom of each RePORT page and select "Data quality issues and corrections" from the Topic list. Please include a detailed description of the problem and the information to be changed.

How do I find information on the rank of an organization, with respect to total NIH support?

As of 2005, the NIH no longer provides comparative ranking tables on its medical research funding. Instead, NIH has developed a Web-based tool that allows one to determine the dollars awarded to any organization or department. Click on Quick Link- Award Data for Individual Organization on left side of RePORT Home Page to access this page. The tool will also allow you to download aggregate data so that you can conduct your own analysis.

Is it possible to see the number of applications submitted by each organization?

RePORTER does not currently provide this information, but it can be requested. Use the feedback button found at the bottom of each RePORT page and select "Request data or an analysis" from the Topic list.

How do I find the total amount of funding received by organizations in a particular state?

Information on funding to each research organization is available on the Funded Organizations page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

How do I find the total amount of funding received by organizations in a particular congressional district?

Information on funding to each research organization is available on the Funded Organizations page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

How do I find foreign grants?

Information on funding to foreign organizations is available on the Funded Organizations page of the RePORT site. A link to this page can be found on the RePORT home page.

When will data on funding by country/state/congressional district/organization be updated?

After the close of each fiscal year on October 31, we begin to update all data reported on an annual basis. Updated reports with the prior fiscal year's data are typically posted to RePORT by the end of December.

Do the data for total funding by state include R&D contracts?

Unless otherwise noted, data for total funding by state include R&D contracts.

How can I find my congressional district?

Please click on this link to find your congressional district.

How do I find information on application success rates?

You can find information on application success rates by clicking on Success Rates on the RePORT Home Page. Here you will find success rates of applications for NIH research and training grants.

How are success rates computed?

Success rates indicate the percentage of reviewed applications that receive funding (excluding reimbursable funding). This is computed on a fiscal year basis. Dividing the number of competing applications funded by the total number of competing applications reviewed determines success rates. Applications that have one or more amendments in the same fiscal year are counted as a single application.

What is the schedule for updating the information on grants and contracts awarded to research organizations, found on the Funded Organizations page?

This information is typically updated in February with grants awarded in the previous fiscal year and in early December with contracts awarded in the previous fiscal year.

How do I apply for an NIH grant?

Information on applying for an NIH grant can be found at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_basics.htm. Grant solicitations specifying areas of research supported are published in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html.

Who can I contact for job/internship/ grant opportunities?

Please visit Research and Training Opportunities at the National Institutes of Health website at: https://www.training.nih.gov/programs for further information regarding jobs and internships. Information on applying for an NIH grant can be found at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_basics.htm. Grant solicitations specifying areas of research supported are published in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html.

Where does one find a guide to explain the meanings of the codes in columns B-G on ARRA project spreadsheets?

For a guide to explain the meanings of the codes in columns B-G on ARRA project spreadsheets, please see the RePORT glossary.

 

RePORTER Frequently Asked Questions (FAQS)

Currency of the Data

In general, the RePORTER database of research projects is updated weekly. Each update includes not only the addition of newly-funded projects, but also revisions to prior awards (e.g., change of grantee institution or revised award amounts). There are several exceptions to certain portions of the database.

When will my project appear on RePORTER?

Generally, grants, along with their official abstract), will appear in RePORTER 7-10 days after their Budget Start Date. RePORTER data is refreshed each week (usually late Sunday nights) newly added projects generally available on Monday mornings. To be included in the weekly refresh the Budget Start Date of the funded award must have passed.

About the Information Available in RePORTER

The RePORT Expenditures and Results, RePORTER system, is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications since 1980, and patents resulting from NIH funding.

RePORTER includes information on research projects funded by the NIH as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Administration for Children and Family (ACF), and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

The information found in RePORTER is drawn from several extant databases–eRA databases, Medline, PubMed Central, the NIH Intramural Database, and iEdison-using linkages among these disparate data sources. The comprehensiveness of these databases varies, as does the quality of the linkages formed among them. Over time, the quality of RePORTER data has improved as a result of changes in both data collection (e.g., implementation of the NIH Public Access policy) and the increased ability to identify missing information that comes from making these data accessible to more people.

Which agencies provide data on projects and for what time periods?
Agency Fiscal Year/Projects Publications Patents Clinical Studies News and More
1993-1998 1999-2004 2005-2009 2010 2011 2012 2013-2017 2018 2019
All NIH Institutes and Centers X X X X X X X X X X X X X
Administration for Children and Families (ACF) - - - - - - X - - - - - -
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) X X X X X X X X X X - X X
All Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (All CDC) X X X X X X X X X X - X X
Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) X
(1993-1997)
- - - - - - - - X - - -
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) X X X X X X X X X X - X X
Veterans Affairs (VA) - - X
(2009)
X X X X X X X - X X
 
Why are the data I retrieved from RePORTER today different than what I found last week?

RePORTER provides the most up-to-date information possible on funded projects, so the data are not frozen and changes in the administrative details of prior awards can occur (e.g., when a principal investigator changes institutions or an award is provided a no-cost extension).

Publications

  • Publications are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding. This is due to the continuous and cumulative nature of knowledge generation across the life of a project and the sometimes long and variable publishing timeline.
  • Some publications will be inadvertently linked to the wrong grant or missing altogether. The association of a publication to NIH-funded extramural research requires that the author(s) acknowledge NIH support in the article and that the acknowledgement be in a form that can be readily associated with a specific grant or contract. Variations in the format used to cite NIH funding will lead to either an inability to make an association or erroneous matches of publications to grants and contracts. The quality of these associations will increase with implementation of the NIH Public Access policy which assures linkages between publications and NIH grants and contracts, and the development and implementation of better data mining techniques.
  • RePORTER lists only publications found in PubMed or PubMed Central. There are publications resulting from funded research that appear in journals that are not part of the PubMed collection and published before the NIH Public Access policy went into effect.
What is an "active" grant? I have a grant but it doesn't show up as active in RePORTER.

An "active" grant is defined by NIH as one which has not yet reached the end of its most recent "budget period." Funding for each grant's "project period" (for most grants, three to five years) is allocated among several budget periods. Each budget period is typically one year, but can be lengthened through a no-cost extension. A budget period ends, and a new one begins, when a new year of funding is allocated through a noncompeting (type 5) award. On rare occasions, the most recent budget period will end before the next noncompeting award can be issued to begin a new budget period. In these cases, a grant will temporarily become inactive until the noncompeting award is issued and the new budget period begins. The grant can still be found in RePORTER by changing the query to search all fiscal years.

Searching by Fiscal Year

  • Active Projects: Unless specified, RePORTER searches for “Active Projects;” the most recent record of projects that have not yet reached their end date (in the case of extramural grants and contracts) or intramural projects from the most recent database of annual reports from the NIH intramural programs. (Information on intramural projects is updated in RePORTER at the close of each fiscal year.) This means that the results of “Active Projects” searches may include projects that were funded with an earlier fiscal year’s appropriation but are still active (e.g., extramural awards in a no-cost extension period) or not yet updated by the end-of-year intramural project report.
  • Prior Years: Searches conducted on fiscal years prior to the current year will produce lists of only those awards funded in the chosen fiscal year
Patents

  • Patents are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding. This is due to the continuous and cumulative nature of knowledge generation across the life of a project and the sometimes long and variable patenting timeline.
  • Patent information in RePORTER is incomplete. The patents in RePORTER come from the iEdison database. Not all recipients of NIH funding are compliant with the iEdison reporting requirements, particularly after their NIH support has ended
Project Categorization

Beginning with projects funded in FY 2008, the research, condition, and/or disease category in which a project falls is determined by an automated text-mining tool. See the Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization Process for a complete description of this categorization process.

Grant and Contract Costs

Except in the case of multi-year funded grants, they do not represent the costs over the life of the project. Costs shown in RePORTER are the total costs (direct + indirect costs) awarded in a single fiscal year. Costs are only available for projects funded by NIH, CDC, FDA, and ACF. For multi-project grants, Total Cost includes funding for all of the constituent subprojects. Breakdowns by Direct Cost and Indirect Cost are available only for NIH awards funded in FY 2012 onward, and are not available for SBIR/STTR awards.

Project Terms
  • Beginning with projects funded in FY 2008, project terms are concepts derived by mining the text of a project’s title, abstract, specific aims, and investigator’s stated public health relevance. For projects funded in fiscal years prior to 2008, the project terms in RePORTER are the same terms used in the NIH CRISP system that RePORTER replaces. See the Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization Process for a complete description of this text mining process.
  • Term searches that span fiscal years before and after 2008 will not be comparable. There is no simple and direct association between the CRISP terms used prior to 2008 and the project concepts derived through text mining in 2008 and later years.
What are the "Match Scores" shown on the Similar Projects tab of the Project Information page?

The “Match Scores” shown on the “Similar Projects” tab indicate the relative degree of similarity of a project to each of the other projects listed on that tab. (A higher match score indicates greater similarity.) They are calculated in the following manner: 

1) A “fingerprint” is created of the project, consisting of scientific terms (keywords mined from written descriptions of the project—title, abstract, specific aims, and public health relevance statement) and a numerical weight for each term. A term’s weight is both directly related to the frequency with which the term appears in the project description (terms appearing most frequently in a project’s description receiving a higher weight) and inversely related to the frequency with which the term appears across all projects in the database (very common terms receiving a lower weight). To create these fingerprints, NIH uses the Elsevier Fingerprint Engine (https://www.elsevier.com/solutions/elsevier-fingerprint-engine), as implemented by NIH for its Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization process (see step 3, “Create the Project Summary” at Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization Process). 

2) The most highly weighted terms in the project’s fingerprint are used to find matching projects in RePORTER with fingerprints containing one or more of these same terms. 

3) The Match Score for each matching project is calculated by cross-multiplying the weights of all terms common to both projects’ fingerprints and then summing these cross-products across all of the common terms.

What is UEI?

The Unique Entity Identifier (UEI) assigned to all entities (public and private companies, individuals, institutions, or organizations) who must register to do business with the federal government in SAM. Update: Notification of Upcoming Change in Federal-wide Unique Entity Identifier Requirements.

By April 2022, the federal government will stop using the DUNS number to uniquely identify entities registered in the System for Award Management (SAM). RePORTER will transition from the DUN and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number to a new government-owned Unique Entity Identifier (UEI).

What is the difference between RePORT and RePORTER?

The RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) website provides access to a variety of reporting tools, reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities. One of the tools available on the RePORT site is the RePORTER (RePORT Expenditures and Results) module. RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of NIH-funded research projects and access publications and patents resulting from NIH funding.

Why are the costs of some projects displayed in italics?

The costs of the subprojects in multi-project grants are italicized in RePORTER. These costs will be included in the costs of the parent award, so, to avoid double-counting, the italicized subproject costs should be excluded when calculating the amount of total funding for a list of projects that contains both the parent award and its subprojects.

Can I view the entire contents of a successful grant application?

If you'd like more information than what is available in the public domain via RePORTER, you can submit a written Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for a copy of a specific grant application to the NIH Institute or Center (IC) that funded the grant. The NIH FOIA website at https://www.nih.gov/institutes-nih/nih-office-director/office-communications-public-liaison/freedom-information-act-office lists the names and addresses of FOIA coordinators for the various ICs.

I am a funded investigator and I mistakenly included proprietary information in my project abstract. How do I change it?

To request a change in the published abstract, please contact the Program Official assigned to your grant. The PO name can be found in the Notice of Grant Award. S/he will submit a request to the NIH electronic Research Administration help desk to have the abstract changed.

How do I add papers that are missing from the 'results' page of my grant?

If you are a NIH grantee, you can reference My NCBI's My Bibliography feature to report missing papers of your grant. For projects from other agencies, please consult with those agencies for relevant policies and practices.

How do I find summaries and results of projects funded by NIH?

You can find summaries and results of projects funded by NIH by using the RePORT Expenditures and Results (RePORTER) module at https://reporter.nih.gov/

How do I find out what publications are associated with a specific grant?

You can search for a project and find associated publications using RePORTER. Enter search criteria in the RePORTER Query Form to generate a hit list of the grant(s) of interest and click on the title of a project to see the Project Details. The "Results" tab of the Project Details page provides information on publications and patents that have acknowledged support from the project. You may also do the reverse and search for a publication to find associated grants.

Is it possible to download the entire RePORTER database or access it through an API?

Annual extracts of the RePORTER data are available for bulk download at the ExPORTER page. Project and Publication data are also available through RePORTER API.

How often is the RePORTER database updated?

The RePORTER database is updated on a weekly basis. Each update includes not only the addition of newly-funded projects, but also revisions to prior awards (e.g., change of grantee institution or revised award amounts).

At what point is the RePORTER data frozen / not expected to change?

RePORTER provides the most up-to-date information possible on funded projects, so the data are not frozen and changes in the administrative details of prior awards can occur (e.g., when a principal investigator changes institutions or an award is provided a no-cost extension). However, changes to awards issued more than two fiscal years ago are rare.

Is it possible to tell when a grant record first appeared in RePORTER?

No. Generally, a new grant will be made available on the first Sunday (RePORTER is updated each weekend) after the notice of grant award was issued or the budget start date, whichever occurs later. However, there are sometimes technical issues that can delay the availability of a grant in RePORTER.

Does RePORTER include information on R&D contracts?

Yes, but for fiscal years prior to 2008, the data for R&D contracts may be incomplete.

How do I submit a request to correct an error in the RePORTER data?

To submit a request to correct an error in the RePORTER data, please use the RePORT Contact Us Form and select "Data quality issues and corrections" from the Topic list. Please include a detailed description of the problem, including the project number and the data to be changed. If multiple project numbers are affected, you may attach a list as part of an Excel or Word document.

Where does RePORTER data come from?

The information found in RePORTER is drawn from several extant databases–eRA databases, Medline, PubMed Central, the NIH Intramural Database, and iEdison–using newly-formed linkages among these disparate data sources. The comprehensiveness of these databases varies, as does the quality of the linkages formed among them. We expect that the quality of RePORTER data will improve over time as a result of changes in both data collection (e.g., implementation of the NIH Public Access policy) and the increased ability to identify missing information that comes from making these data accessible to members of the public.

How are “project terms” generated and how are they assigned to a project?

Information on the current process for generating project terms can be found at RCDC. Use of this process began with projects funded in fiscal year 2008. Project terms prior to 2008 were generated using a different process and will not be comparable to the current categorizations.

How do I register for a MyRePORTER account?

To register for a MyRePORTER account click on the “Register” link in the upper-right hand corner of the RePORTER Query Form, or on the login page. You will be taken to the MyRePORTER Registration page where you will be asked to enter your email address and create and confirm an account password. Click the “Register” button to confirm your registration.

How do I reset my password?

From the MyRePORTER Login screen click on the “Forgot Password?” link. You will be prompted to enter the same email address that you originally registered with and create and confirm a new account password. Once you have entered this information, click the “Submit” button. You will immediately receive an email at your registered email address that will ask you to confirm you were the user attempting to reset the password. Once you have taken the appropriate steps to confirm your password in the email, you will be able to login to MyRePORTER using your new password.

How do I save a query?

To save a query, you must first log-in to MyRePORTER. Select “New Query” from the “Go to” drop-down menu. Once you login you will be taken to the RePORTER Query Form. Enter your desired search criteria in the Query Form and select the “Save Query” button. Enter a title for your query and any applicable notes, click the “Save New” button, and your query will instantly be saved to your Dashboard.

Where is the ExPORTER information drawn from?
Information is drawn from several extant databases: Patents, Publications and Clinical Trial information where NIH funded projects have been cited.
  • eRA IRDB (IMPAC II Reporting Database)
  • iEdison
  • Clinical Trials.gov
  • NIH Intramural Database (NIDB)
  • PubMed / PubMed Central data from SPIRES in IRDB
What is the unique identifier for these data?

The Project and Abstract files have the APPLICATION_ID in common.
The Publication and Link files have the PMID in common.
The Patent files have the PROJECT_ID which relates to Core_Project_Num.
The Clinical Studies relate on the Core Project Number/ Core_Project_Num.

Which agencies have information in ExPORTER files?
ExPORTER files contain research projects funded by:
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF)
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  • Veterans Affairs (VA)
Where is the PI email address?

Individual PI email addresses are available on RePORTER to facilitate collaboration and the dissemination, use, and translation of research and its results. RePORTER does not supply and will not give, sell, or otherwise transfer - these addresses to any party for the purposes of initiating, or enabling others to initiate, commercial electronic messages. Bulk email addresses are not available through RePORTER/ExPORTER.

However, contact information for grant recipients has been made available in response to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests in the past. NIH now makes some of this contact information available in a downloadable file in the NIH FOIA Library, under the frequently requested reports at https://www.nih.gov/institutes-nih/nih-office-director/office-communications-public-liaison/freedom-information-act-office/contact-information-nih-supported-pis. Questions about the FOIA process can be directed to nihfoia@mail.nih.gov.

Why do the file sizes change so much over time?

The ExPORTER files have evolved over time in both structure and content. Some data that was not available at the time have been provided in ancillary files such as funding and DUNS information. Some fields that currently allow for multiple entries, earlier had single entries, FY 2008 and 2009 were ARRA stimulus years, Funding Mechanism did not appear in ExPORTER files until 2009, and so forth. ExPORTER files represent the information found in RePORTER at the time the file was created.

How are projects linked to Publications?

The data RePORTER and ExPORTER present on publications is integrated from multiple sources, via the NIH internal tool SPIRES, the Scientific Publication Information Retrieval and Evaluation System. SPIRES is an independent system that gathers and integrates information from PubMed, NCBI My Bibliography, and the NIH Intramural Database to link NIH projects with research publications.

The most common source of associations is publications that list NIH project numbers in the acknowledgements section or elsewhere in the publication, which are annotated by PubMed. As PubMed staff index each abstract, they annotate the PubMed records with any grants that are cited as providing support in the publication itself. These grant numbers then appear on the PubMed abstract page under the heading "Grant Support". Publications are associated with projects but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding.

How are projects linked to Patents?

The patent data in RePORTER and ExPORTER is associated with NIH projects via the data collected through the iEdison database, which grantee organizations use to report information relating to inventions disclosed to the funding agency. In RePORTER and ExPORTER, patents are not currently reported for funding agencies other than the NIH. Patents are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding.

Please note that the patent information in RePORTER is incomplete. RePORTER and ExPORTER only lists issued patents, and does not show patent in-progress applications. Additionally, not all recipients of NIH funding are compliant with the iEdison reporting requirements, particularly after their NIH support has ended.

How are projects linked to Clinical Studies?

The Clinical Studies included in ExPORTER files have cited one or more projects in RePORTER/ExPORTER. These linkages between Clinical Studies and projects come directly from ClinicalTrials.gov, which provides RePORTER with a feed listing any grant numbers that have been entered as part of the trial registrations. Clinical Studies are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding.

Why is the cost field blank for some records?

RePORTER and ExPORTER display information reported by agencies other than the NIH, some of whom do not report funding data. Costs are only available for projects funded by NIH, CDC, FDA, and ACF.

Additionally, the content of the ExPORTER files has evolved over time to include more data elements as they became available. ExPORTER provides supplementary files with cost information for FY 1985 - FY 1999. Please click the "Updated funding and DUNS information" text to download this data.

These accessory files include data items for total costs that can be linked to the Project files using the APPLICATION_ID or FULL_PROJECT_NUM columns.

What is the difference between ExPORTER and CRISP?

The CRISP system was the predecessor to RePORTER. It was taken off-line on December 30, 2009. CRISP Legacy data files are available for download here and include grants funded as early as FY 1970. CRISP files contain fewer data fields than ExPORTER files.

What does bulk RePORTER data include for ExPORTER files?
Bulk RePORTER data includes below data:
  • Projects
  • Project Abstracts – separate due to file size considerations
  • Publications citing support from projects
  • Link Tables for Project to Publication Associations – used to establish the many-to-many relationships between projects and publications citing support from these projects
  • Patents citing support from projects
  • Clinical Studies citing support from projects
What is updated at end of each fiscal year?
  • Consolidated Project and Abstract files are created for the closing fiscal year, including finalized data on R&D contracts and NIH Intramural projects.
  • Project and Abstract files for the three prior fiscal years are also updated, reflecting any award modifications or changes made since the previous release.
  • Publication and Publication Link files are updated.
NOTE: The previous fiscal year’s Project file will be updated with the addition of data for NIH Spending Categories field approximately 3 weeks after the completion and release of the RCDC Categorical Spending information (following the release of the President’s Budget).
Where is the Data Dictionary for ExPORTER files?

Data Dictionary for ExPORTER files can be found here.