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RePORTER Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


Q&A About NIH

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About RePORTER Data

  • Currency of the Data

    In general, the RePORTER database of research projects is updated weekly. Each update includes not only the addition of newly-funded projects, but also revisions to prior awards (e.g., change of grantee institution or revised award amounts). There are several exceptions to certain portions of the database.

  • About the Information Available in RePORTER

    The RePORT Expenditures and Results, RePORTER system, is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of both intramural and extramural NIH-funded research projects from the past 25 years and access publications since 1980, and patents resulting from NIH funding.

    RePORTER includes information on research projects funded by the NIH as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Administration for Children and Family (ACF), and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

    The information found in RePORTER is drawn from several extant databases–eRA databases, Medline, PubMed Central, the NIH Intramural Database, and iEdison-using linkages among these disparate data sources. The comprehensiveness of these databases varies, as does the quality of the linkages formed among them. Over time, the quality of RePORTER data has improved as a result of changes in both data collection (e.g., implementation of the NIH Public Access policy) and the increased ability to identify missing information that comes from making these data accessible to more people.

  • Which agencies provide data on projects and for what time periods?

    Agency Fiscal Year/Projects Publications Patents Clinical Studies News and More
    1993-1998 1999-2004 2005-2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    All NIH Institutes and Centers X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
    Administration for Children and Families (ACF) - - - - - - X X X X - - - - -
    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) X X X X X X X X X X X X - X X
    All Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (All CDC) X X X X X X X X X X X X - X X
    Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) X
    (1993-1997)
    - - - - - - - - - - X - - -
    U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) X X X X X X X X X X X X - X X
    Veterans Affairs (VA) - - X
    (2009)
    X X X X X X X X X - X X

  • Why are the data I retrieved from RePORTER today different than what I found last week?

    RePORTER provides the most up-to-date information possible on funded projects, so the data are not frozen and changes in the administrative details of prior awards can occur (e.g., when a principal investigator changes institutions or an award is provided a no-cost extension).

  • Publications

    • Publications are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding. This is due to the continuous and cumulative nature of knowledge generation across the life of a project and the sometimes long and variable publishing timeline.
    • Some publications will be inadvertently linked to the wrong grant or missing altogether. The association of a publication to NIH-funded extramural research requires that the author(s) acknowledge NIH support in the article and that the acknowledgement be in a form that can be readily associated with a specific grant or contract. Variations in the format used to cite NIH funding will lead to either an inability to make an association or erroneous matches of publications to grants and contracts. The quality of these associations will increase with implementation of the NIH Public Access policy which assures linkages between publications and NIH grants and contracts, and the development and implementation of better data mining techniques.
    • RePORTER lists only publications found in PubMed or PubMed Central. There are publications resulting from funded research that appear in journals that are not part of the PubMed collection and published before the NIH Public Access policy went into effect.

  • What is an "active" grant? I have a grant but it doesn't show up as active in RePORTER.

    An "active" grant is defined by NIH as one which has not yet reached the end of its most recent "budget period." Funding for each grant's "project period" (for most grants, three to five years) is allocated among several budget periods. Each budget period is typically one year, but can be lengthened through a no-cost extension. A budget period ends, and a new one begins, when a new year of funding is allocated through a noncompeting (type 5) award. On rare occasions, the most recent budget period will end before the next noncompeting award can be issued to begin a new budget period. In these cases, a grant will temporarily become inactive until the noncompeting award is issued and the new budget period begins. The grant can still be found in RePORTER by changing the query to search all fiscal years.

  • Searching by Fiscal Year

    • Active Projects: Unless specified, RePORTER searches for “Active Projects;” the most recent record of projects that have not yet reached their end date (in the case of extramural grants and contracts) or intramural projects from the most recent database of annual reports from the NIH intramural programs. (Information on intramural projects is updated in RePORTER at the close of each fiscal year.) This means that the results of “Active Projects” searches may include projects that were funded with an earlier fiscal year’s appropriation but are still active (e.g., extramural awards in a no-cost extension period) or not yet updated by the end-of-year intramural project report.
    • Prior Years: Searches conducted on fiscal years prior to the current year will produce lists of only those awards funded in the chosen fiscal year.

  • Patents

    • Patents are associated with projects, but cannot be identified with any particular year of the project or fiscal year of funding. This is due to the continuous and cumulative nature of knowledge generation across the life of a project and the sometimes long and variable patenting timeline.
    • Patent information in RePORTER is incomplete. The patents in RePORTER come from the iEdison database. Not all recipients of NIH funding are compliant with the iEdison reporting requirements, particularly after their NIH support has ended.

  • Project Categorization

    Beginning with projects funded in FY 2008, the research, condition, and/or disease category in which a project falls is determined by an automated text-mining tool. See the Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization Process for a complete description of this categorization process.

  • Grant and Contract Costs

    Except in the case of multi-year funded grants, they do not represent the costs over the life of the project. Costs shown in RePORTER are the total costs (direct + indirect costs) awarded in a single fiscal year. Costs are only available for projects funded by NIH, CDC, FDA, and ACF. For multi-project grants, Total Cost includes funding for all of the constituent subprojects. Breakdowns by Direct Cost and Indirect Cost are available only for NIH awards funded in FY 2012 onward, and are not available for SBIR/STTR awards.

  • Project Terms

    • Beginning with projects funded in FY 2008, project terms are concepts derived by mining the text of a project’s title, abstract, specific aims, and investigator’s stated public health relevance. For projects funded in fiscal years prior to 2008, the project terms in RePORTER are the same terms used in the NIH CRISP system that RePORTER replaces. See the Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization Process for a complete description of this text mining process.
    • Term searches that span fiscal years before and after 2008 will not be comparable. There is no simple and direct association between the CRISP terms used prior to 2008 and the project concepts derived through text mining in 2008 and later years.

  • What are the "Match Scores" shown on the Similar Projects tab of the Project Information page?

    The “Match Scores” shown on the “Similar Projects” tab indicate the relative degree of similarity of a project to each of the other projects listed on that tab. (A higher match score indicates greater similarity.) They are calculated in the following manner:

    1) A “fingerprint” is created of the project, consisting of scientific terms (keywords mined from written descriptions of the project—title, abstract, specific aims, and public health relevance statement) and a numerical weight for each term. A term’s weight is both directly related to the frequency with which the term appears in the project description (terms appearing most frequently in a project’s description receiving a higher weight) and inversely related to the frequency with which the term appears across all projects in the database (very common terms receiving a lower weight). To create these fingerprints, NIH uses the Elsevier Fingerprint Engine (https://www.elsevier.com/solutions/elsevier-fingerprint-engine), as implemented by NIH for its Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization process (see step 3, “Create the Project Summary” at https://report.nih.gov/rcdc/process.aspx).

    2) The most highly weighted terms in the project’s fingerprint are used to find matching projects in RePORTER with fingerprints containing one or more of these same terms.

    3) The Match Score for each matching project is calculated by cross-multiplying the weights of all terms common to both projects’ fingerprints and then summing these cross-products across all of the common terms.

The RePORT Expenditures and Results Module

  • What is the difference between RePORT and RePORTER?

    The RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) website provides access to a variety of reporting tools, reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities. One of the tools available on the RePORT site is the RePORTER (RePORT Expenditures and Results) module. RePORTER is an electronic tool that allows users to search a repository of NIH-funded research projects and access publications and patents resulting from NIH funding.

  • What happened to CRISP?

    The CRISP system was taken off-line on December 30, 2009 and replaced by the RePORT Expenditures and Results (RePORTER) module. The CRISP legacy data can be downloaded at the ExPORTER site.

  • Why are the costs of some projects displayed in italics?

    The costs of the subprojects in multi-project grants are italicized in RePORTER. These costs will be included in the costs of the parent award, so, to avoid double-counting, the italicized subproject costs should be excluded when calculating the amount of total funding for a list of projects that contains both the parent award and its subprojects.

Project Summaries and Results

The RePORTER Database

  • Is it possible to download the entire RePORTER database or access it through an API?

    The RePORTER database is available for download at the ExPORTER site. The RePORTER database is not available through an API.

  • How often is the RePORTER database updated?

    The RePORTER database is updated on a weekly basis. Each update includes not only the addition of newly-funded projects, but also revisions to prior awards (e.g., change of grantee institution or revised award amounts).

  • At what point is the RePORTER data frozen / not expected to change?

    RePORTER provides the most up-to-date information possible on funded projects, so the data are not frozen and changes in the administrative details of prior awards can occur (e.g., when a principal investigator changes institutions or an award is provided a no-cost extension). However, changes to awards issued more than two fiscal years ago are rare.

  • Is it possible to tell when a grant record first appeared in RePORTER?

    No. Generally, a new grant will be made available on the first Sunday (RePORTER is updated each weekend) after the notice of grant award was issued or the budget start date, whichever occurs later. However, there are sometimes technical issues that can delay the availability of a grant in RePORTER.

  • Does RePORTER include information on R&D contracts?

    Yes, but for fiscal years prior to 2008, the data for R&D contracts may be incomplete.

  • How do I submit a request to correct an error in the RePORTER data?

    To submit a request to correct an error in the RePORTER data, please use the RePORT Contact Us Form and select "Data quality issues and corrections" from the Topic list. Please include a detailed description of the problem, including the project number and the data to be changed. If multiple project numbers are affected, you may attach a list as part of an Excel or Word document.

  • How do I add papers that are missing from the 'results' page of my grant?

    If you are an NIH grantee, you can link grants to papers that have been published in the past by using the NIH Manuscript Submission System at https://www.nihms.nih.gov/. Using your eRA Commons account, log into the Manuscript System, select “Grants Reporting,” and then select “Add from PubMed.” Based on a name match, the system will show PubMed papers that may be yours. Select the paper that you would like to add, and then select the grant to which you would like to add the paper. A set of instructions is available here.

  • Where does RePORTER data come from?

    The information found in RePORTER is drawn from several extant databases–eRA databases, Medline, PubMed Central, the NIH Intramural Database, and iEdison–using newly-formed linkages among these disparate data sources. The comprehensiveness of these databases varies, as does the quality of the linkages formed among them. We expect that the quality of RePORTER data will improve over time as a result of changes in both data collection (e.g., implementation of the NIH Public Access policy) and the increased ability to identify missing information that comes from making these data accessible to members of the public.

  • How are “project terms” generated and how are they assigned to a project?

    Information on the current process for generating project terms can be found at https://report.nih.gov/rcdc. Use of this process began with projects funded in fiscal year 2008. Project terms prior to 2008 were generated using a different process and will not be comparable to the current categorizations.

MyRePORTER

  • How do I register for a MyRePORTER account?

    To register for a MyRePORTER account click on the “Register” link in the upper-right hand corner of the RePORTER Query Form, or on the login page. You will be taken to the MyRePORTER Registration page where you will be asked to enter your email address and create and confirm an account password. Click the “Register” button to confirm your registration.

  • How do I reset my password?

    From the MyRePORTER Login screen click on the “Forgot Password?” link. You will be prompted to enter the same email address that you originally registered with and create and confirm a new account password. Once you have entered this information, click the “Submit” button. You will immediately receive an email at your registered email address that will ask you to confirm you were the user attempting to reset the password. Once you have taken the appropriate steps to confirm your password in the email, you will be able to login to MyRePORTER using your new password.

  • How do I save a query?

    To save a query, you must first log-in to MyRePORTER. Select “New Query” from the “Go to” drop-down menu. Once you login you will be taken to the RePORTER Query Form. Enter your desired search criteria in the Query Form and select the “Save Query” button. Enter a title for your query and any applicable notes, click the “Save New” button, and your query will instantly be saved to your Dashboard.

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